Drop off sites for unneeded prescription drugs

There was an article in the paper recently regarding drop off sites for prescription drugs. It said Hennepin County collected 7 tons of prescribed medicine last year! That is an amazing figure! We often have our clients ask us what to do with their left over and expired medicine. We can not just throw it away or flush it down the toilet anymore. There are many drop off sites around the city. The closest to us is at the government centers at Ridgedale and Brookdale. Here are instructions and a map of Hennepin County drop off sites. Be sure to do the right thing and get rid of unneeded and expired medicine where it can not harm people, animals or the environment.

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Relief from Cat Allergies?

There is a study here in Minnesota being run on a new medication that is supposed to help people suffering from sensitivities to their cat. This is not an endorsement because the company is new and I don’t know what the medication is. But if you are one of many who love their cats but are allergic to them, this might be worth inquiring about. Check out the CATALYST Study here.

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Nice tribute to an old friend

James Lileks wrote a nice tribute to his old dog in today’s Star Tribune. Find that here.

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Red Lake Reservation Clinic

I helped out At the spay/neuter clinic on the Red Lake reservation this week. I posted some pictures in an album over on our facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151989246889664.1073741939.212319544663&type=3

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Recipie for removing skunk odor from your dog

This time of year brings out increased encounters with skunks. Here is an easy recipe for neutralizing the odor. Bring the supplies with you and you can mix it up in a plastic container to use in the field when needed.
1 quart hydrogen peroxide, 1/2 cup baking soda and a tablespoon of dish soap. Put on rubber gloves, mix the ingredients and sponge the dog meticulously. It works very well.

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Dr. Rachel Stephensen had her baby!

Dr Stephensen had her baby!

Dr Stephensen had her baby

Malcolm Liam Preston Stephensen
Born Friday, July 19th, 2013 7lbs, 13 oz

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Helpful tips with storms and fireworks anxiety for your pet

FIREWORK AND THUNDERSTORM PHOBIAS

How to deal with the problem in the short term.

Drugs
These may be useful in some cases but should only be given under veterinary supervision. Remember they should be given so they take effect BEFORE any noise starts or panic sets in. This is usually at least an hour prior to the event. Sedatives may help the pet sleep through the event or be less aware of the stimuli but do not reduce anxiety. Anti-anxiety drugs may reduce anxiety and panic but may not calm the dog sufficiently. There are also drugs such as some of the antidepressants that can be used on an ongoing basis to try and prevent or reduce the effect of the stimulus should it arise. Then, short term drugs on the day of the fireworks (or storm) may be added to some of these drugs if needed. The dog appeasing pheromone (DAP®) and natural products such as melatonin might also be considered concurrently with other drugs.

Punishment
Don’t punish your dog when he is scared, it only confirms to him that there is something to be afraid of and will make him worse. In addition, if you are upset or anxious about your pet’s behavior, this will also make your dog more anxious.

Reassurance
Don’t fuss, pet or try to reassure your dog when he is scared since he may regard this as a reward for the behavior he is engaging in at that time, so that with each future exposure the behavior may become increasingly intense. Although it may be difficult, try to ignore any fearful behavior that occurs.

Training devices and commands
Practice training your dog to settle and focus on commands for favored treats and toys. Try and associate this training with a favored location in the house (one where the noise of the fireworks and storm might be less obvious – see below), and use some training cues (e.g. a favored CD, a favored blanket) each time you do the training (so that the command, location and cues help to immediately calm the dog). A head halter can also be used to help control, distract and calm the dog during training. Then at the time of the storm, use your commands, location, cues and head halter to try and calm the dog, while avoiding punishment or reassurance of the fearful response (see above).

Feeding
Feed your dog a good meal, rich in carbohydrate and with added vitamin B6, a few hours prior to the expected fireworks (or storm). To ensure a good appetite, it may be necessary not to feed him at any other time during the day. However, if your dog is prone to diarrhea when scared or at other times, please consult your veterinarian for advice regarding this strategy.

Environment
Make sure that the environment is safe and secure at all times. Even the most placid dog can behave unpredictably when frightened by noise and, should he bolt and escape, he could get injured or lost.

Can I do anything to reduce the impact of the noise and flashes from the fireworks or storms?
When the season begins, try to ensure that your dog can reside in a well-curtained or blacked out room when it starts to go dark. Blacking out the room removes the potentially additional problems of flashing lights, flares etc.

Provide plenty of familiar toys and games that might help to distract the pet.

Try to arrange company for your dog so that he is not abandoned in the room.

Make sure that all the windows and doors are shut so the sound is deadened as much as possible. Try taking your pet to a room or area of the house where the stimuli will be at their mildest and the dog can be most easily distracted. Sometimes nested cardboard boxes or a blanket placed over the cage can greatly mute the sound. Be certain however that there is enough air circulation so that the pet does not overheat.

Try to provide background sounds from the radio or television. Rap or similar music with a lot of constant drum beats does help. It does not necessarily have to be loud as long as there is a constant distracting beat to the music that will prevent him from concentrating on the noises outside. Other background noises and such as a fan running or even “white” noise devices can help to block outdoor noises.

Ignore the noises yourself and try to involve your pet in some form of active game.

Some products and exercises might be useful to further secure or calm the dog. Anxiety wraps, a cape or mat that reduces static, a head halter for control or TTouch therapy may help to calm the dog further.

My friend down the street has a dog that is not scared of loud noises and gets along well with mine. She has offered to lend me her dog for support. Shall I accept?

This may be an excellent strategy. Keeping the two together during the evenings may help. Playing with the non-fearful dog when your own becomes scared may help to encourage him to join in and reduce his fear.

Is there anything else that I can do that is worthwhile?
Don’t just ignore the problem because it only happens intermittently or for a few days each year. Instigate a desensitization program once the season is over so that you ensure your dog loses fear of the situation.

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Recycling for Raptors

Plymouth Heights Pet Hospital has added a drop bin for Recycle for Raptors. You can drop off your used ink jet cartridges at our hospital.
Look here for more information:

http://www.raptor.cvm.umn.edu/SupportGetInvolved/Recycling/

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Tick Season is here

Watch out Minnesota! We are officially entering “high-risk” tick season, according to the Minnesota Department of Health.

Dave Neitzel, a state epidemiologist, said while the season was delayed because of our prolonged winter the recent rain and warm up will bring out ticks in the next few days.

“Unfortunately the damp weather we have had recently makes it easy for the ticks to come out and feed and unfortunately people and their pets will get exposed to them,” he said.

He said ticks can be so small they can go unnoticed, even he can’t escape them.

“We had some of these ticks on ourselves when we were out hiking just north of the Twin Cities” he said.

The latest data from MDH show that from 1986 to 2010 nearly 15,000 cases of tick-borne diseases were reported. The majority of cases were Lyme disease.

Neitzel says the best way to protect yourself is to use a DEET or permethrin repellent. For pets he suggests using products like Frontline.

See the Kare11 video here:

http://www.kare11.com/news/article/1027413/391/Minnesota-enters-high-risk-tick-season

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Feline Nutrition

At the request of Paws Place Animal Sanctuary, I wrote an article for their newsletter regarding feline nutrition. Because it is such an important topic, and something we try to teach our clients daily, I am going to post this on our website here. Hopefully it will start a conversation and get you thinking about healthy dietary options for your cats.

I have not used this blog as often as I wished and I will try to do better in the future. That may be wishful thinking with the full force of spring upon us (finally!) which is usually our busiest season. But look for more things on our website in the future including YouTube video directions for routine pet care as well as physical therapy techniques. You can receive email alerts when we post new blog messages by subscribing using the links to the left of this posting. A blog is also supposed to be interactive so if you want to give feedback or ask questions about what we post, we welcome it.

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